Dolls with a Soul, a Story and Stars in their Eyes

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”More than mere playthings, Enchanted Dolls are a brand of elegantly sculpted and articulated works of art. Adorned with elaborate costumes and graced with precious gemstones, metals, and rare found objects, each ball-jointed porcelain doll intricately conveys an aspect of our humanity.”

Makhdot
Makhdot

makhdot2

Bride of Frankenstein
Bride of Frankenstein
Elena the Beautiful
Elena the Beautiful
Stepmother
Stepmother
Imperial Concubine
Imperial Concubine
Muse of Art Nouveau
Muse of Art Nouveau
Muse of Art Nouveau2
Muse of Art Nouveau
Alice
Alice
Cinderella
Cinderella
Cinderella2
Cinderella
Stockholm Syndrome
Stockholm Syndrome
Stockholm Syndrome
Stockholm Syndrome
Stockholm Syndrome
Stockholm Syndrome
The Princess and the Frog
The Princess and the Frog
The Vessel
The Vessel
The Bloody Lady Elizabeth Bathory
The Bloody Lady Elizabeth Bathory
Dunyazade
Dunyazade
Dunyazade
Dunyazade
Scheherazade
Scheherazade

This page is really only a very small incomplete partial view of Marina Bychkova’s work. There are so many little details about the clothes, the props, the tattooes and the stories that are part of each Enchanted Dolls. Visit the homepage by clicking on the last picture below and/or each of the pictures above for details on those I chose to present here on Loud Alien Noize.

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Ray Caesar

The Trouble with Angels 

Ray Caesar says that issues with his father contributed to the arrival of Harry, an “alternate,” when he was 10. The boy is disguised as a girl in Caesar’s art, and remains present in his daily life as an alter ego. “Harry is beyond anger – he enjoys it,” says Caesar. “My job is to keep Harry under control.”

Sort of. 

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Click for artist homepage

Caesar suffers from Dissociative Identity Disorder, uses his art as an outlet to express trauma. He was born in London, England in 1958 and moved with his family to Canada in 1967. He describes his childhood art as “atypical and aberrant” as it was unlike the bright pop art of the 60s and 70s. Drawing inspiration from era paintings, Caesar creates fantasy scenes that include innocent young girls, sensual young women or ageless divas or cold blooded predators, sirens/octopussy creatures. Some of these feminine characters seem out of place in their antiquated world, posing in a manner that would have been very unseemly a century ago. I hope you will like these surreal paintings. Ray Caesar is considered by many one of the best of the Pop Surrealist modern painters with Mark Ryden. 

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homeFeature

Jim Kazanjian

     Surreal Architecture 

Vessel
Vessel
Station
Station
Backyard
Backyard
Object
Object
UFO
UFO
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Bubble
untitledFacade_sm
Facade
Vehicule
Vehicule
Exterior
Exterior
House
House

Bob Dob

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Purity

”I love to create worlds where the dark side of human nature is present. Life isn’t always good times. While in our youth we experience many things we would rather forget but this is what defines us.  That’s why my characters have an adolescent quality to them.  I’ve been very fortunate in experiencing and hearing many great stories in my life which now find their way into my paintings.”

Early Bird Gets The Worm
Early Bird Gets The Worm
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Horror Hotel
A Little Birdie
A Little Birdie
Good Fortune
Good Fortune
Cigar Break
Cigar Break
Fat Cat Must Die
Fat Cat Must Die
Death of an Icon
Death of an Icon
Black Eyes Mouseketeers
Black Eyes Mouseketeers
Mouseketeers Bones
Mouseketeers Bones
“On August 6th 1970 the war began when the radical Youth International Party, aka Yippies, invaded Disneyland as a way to rebel and protest against the establishment. They were successful in taking over Tom Sawyer’s Island for a “smoke-in,” taunted guests with their chants of anarchy, and attempted to raise their flag at city hall. Mickey Mouse and friends were under attack. But from this event arose the Mousketeer Army. They battled back to defeat the oppressive ideologies of the Yippies who’s only objective was for Disneyland to cease to exist. The Mouseketeer Army is the last hope to preserve the Magic Kingdom.”
“On August 6th 1970 the war began when the radical Youth International Party, aka Yippies, invaded Disneyland as a way to rebel and protest against the establishment. They were successful in taking over Tom Sawyer’s Island for a “smoke-in,” taunted guests with their chants of anarchy, and attempted to raise their flag at city hall. Mickey Mouse and friends were under attack. But from this event arose the Mouseketeer Army. They battled back to defeat the oppressive ideologies of the Yippies who’s only objective was for Disneyland to cease to exist. The Mouseketeer Army is the last hope to preserve the Magic Kingdom.”
"Tables Have Turned" Krampus , 2014
“Tables Have Turned” Krampus , 2014
Drink Up
Drink Up
Mouseketeer Tony
Mouseketeer Tony
Fight Fight Fight
Fight Fight Fight   
Fish in a Barrel
Fish in a Barrel
Die
Die
Uplifting
Uplifting

Bob Dob Art (3)

Waiting in Vain
Waiting in Vain
Blue Skies
Blue Skies
Lonely Day
Lonely Day
Where Crows Die
Where Crows Die
 #pillhead #blockhead #shithead #pothead
#pillhead #blockhead #shithead #pothead
4:20
4:20
Mario Trece
Mario Trece
Luigi Trece
Luigi Trece
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”Barrels of Fun”
Ride You Bastard
Ride You Bastard
 Visit BOB DOB.Com for much. much more!

Timothy Cummins

Figurative painter Timothy Cummings has a wild fantasy life and a dark side. He is also one of the few enviable people who has known all of his life what his purpose is, and has been pursuing it like a heat-seeking missile since his childhood.

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Timothy Cummings (13)

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Cummings was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico and raised in the comfort of a highly supportive family. From early on, Cummings’ mother actively fostered his individuality and facilitated the realization of his fantasies, whether doing so entailed providing the young Cummings with supplies to support his burgeoning artistic habits, or allowing him to wear a dress and play with dolls instead of playing football.

One Trick Pony Ride
One Trick Pony Ride

Phantasmaphile

Boy With a Pearl Necklace
Boy With a Pearl Necklace

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Inked

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This is really only a very, very small, incomplete portion of everything Timothy Cummings does, subjectively chosen by me, to introduce him to my readers. Click on his name to see all the galleries and expos and exhibitions , projects and collections, etc. on his home website.

Spirits of the Dead

The Horror…The Sacrifice…The Emptiness…

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Each time I see or hear about the tragic death of a young talented musician, actor, performer or artist, it reminds me of the cinematographic adaptation by Fellini of a short story by American author Edgar A. Poe, first published in 1841 ”Never Bet The Devil your Head–A Tale with a Moral” that is precisely about the sacrifice of those stars that we so freely create now and then, those who made it far enough to see themselves exposed to a decaying life, falling apart into superficiality and eventually totally lose sight of everything that really matters… You see guys like Layne Staley and Kurt Cobain (both incidentally died on April the 5th) who were terrified, unable to cope anymore, feeling so alone and abandoned that they chose death.  I won’t tell their kids or any kid at all that ”it’s better to burn out than to fade away” like it’s written to Boddha — Kurt ‘s childhood imaginary friend that later became his alter-ego — in Cobain’s suicide note. I know they will have to be either so pained by it all that they will chose to stay away from it all or either suffer more or less the same fate.As I was saying, I was talking about this Fellini’s movie called Toby Dammit, played here by Terence Stamp who gives an astonishing performance in this superb short from the collective ”Spirits of the Dead” (1968 – I was 1-year-old!) I never forgot that face, never will and I totally freaked out when I later learned that it was in fact THE DEVIL HIMSELF who was represented here! I had for sure seen it when I was young, I have no idea how old, but one thing is for sure, I never forgot it. It really haunted me; Fellini creates both haunting and magnificent visions based on our lives.. He resembles a child.. One second he can be so naive and full of a sense of amazement but  in a flash you’ll be thrown in something very ”Tragédie Grecque” and he will bring you to a caricatured degree that is so satirical,  surreal, maniacal and nightmarish that you will want to escape this bad dream where everyone looks and acts in such strange manners. Nope I never forgot it, I never could forget the first time I saw the devil’s face…

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Here it is for you, the only horror movie Federico Fellini ever did, watch it here from Spirits of the Dead, TOBY DAMMIT!

Dino Valls

Surreal Psychic Surgery on Ethereal Bodies

NEVUS (2013)
NEVUS (2013)

Born in 1959 in Zaragoza but living and working in Madrid, Dino Valls is one of the Spanish representatives of the vanguard of figurative art. His painting, elaborating and expanding the methods of past masters, centers on the human psyche by using figurative techniques only as a formal support in which to project a conceptual content laden with profound psychic weight, where the most obscure pulsations develop in a symbolic process of intellectualism.

LA NAVE DE LOS LOCOS (1992)
LA NAVE DE LOS LOCOS (1992)
LECCIONES DE TINIEBLAS (1993)
LECCIONES DE TINIEBLAS (1993)
LITURGIA ABISAL (1993)
LITURGIA ABISAL (1993)

After receiving his degree in medicine and surgery in 1982, he decided to devote himself exclusively to painting; the kind of painting which would be influenced by the humanistic perspective that brought  about the study of man. This kind of attitude is reminiscent of the creative climate of the Renaissance. His passion for ancient painting moved him to study seriously the techniques of the great masters in the major European museums and in 1991, Valls studied the art of egg tempera and the technique of the Italian and Flemish masters of the 16th and 17th centuries. Egg tempera remains his favorite technique for painting.

ARBOR VITAE (1994)
ARBOR VITAE (1994)
LA CUERDA DE PLATA (1995)
LA CUERDA DE PLATA (1995)

Art is the only medium which allows man to unite his logical thought and his magical thought, redeeming him from the profound dichotomy which exists between both. Curiosity incites us to step out into the field of logic, raising our gaze beyond what may be recognized. This may be the point of inflection which leads us unreality in Dino Valls’ painting.

ARACNE (1998)
ARACNE (1998)
CRIPTODIDIMO (1999)
CRIPTODIDIMO (1999)
PER LUCTUM PER LUCTAM (1999)
PER LUCTUM PER LUCTAM (1999)

One of the privileges by those dedicated to art is that related to a special form of possession. Although a person’s desire to grasp another may never be completely fulfilled, being able to create an image the possession of which begins and ends strictly in the actual creation, is an eminently artistic prerogative, that in addition to being much more satisfactory, accompanies another aspect which is not of less importance: he concept of endopathy, according to which, in order to paint a figure, one has to become it. Just as all paintings are self-portraits, only mirrors hang on the walls, which means an extension of the relation between participation and effect upon each other by the work of art, the author and the spectator.

Introitus I-II-III (2000)
Introitus I-II-III (2000)
STIGMATA (2002)
STIGMATA (2002)
AURA (2003)
AURA (2003)
HIATUS (2003)
HIATUS (2003)
FORABILIS (2000)
FORABILIS (2000)
MARTYR (2005)
MARTYR (2005)
PSICOSTASIA (2005)
PSICOSTASIA (2005)

On the other hand, the relation between the person who looks and what is being contemplated causes archetypes to appear and ends up by establishing an active communication between the work and the receiver, as it is based on the power of projection which the unconscious causes to arise in the person looking.

REGRESSIO (2005)
REGRESSIO (2005)
REGRESSUS (2005)
REGRESSUS (2005)
EMBLEMA (1991)
EMBLEMA (1991)
ARGENTEA (2006)
ARGENTEA (2006)
FLOS (2007)
FLOS (2007)

The gaze discovers the painting and this reveals what we only know intuitively: the irrational. It is during our attempt to rationalize it that the conflicts arises, originating in our collective cultural unconsciousness, which scientific research continues to try to unmask.

IPSIUS F (2007)
IPSIUS F (2007)
LIMBUS (2009)
LIMBUS (2009)
ITER LAPIDUM (2010)
ITER LAPIDUM (2010)

 

COLLECTIO (2011)
COLLECTIO (2011)
PROSCAENIA (2011)
PROSCAENIA (2011)
DIES IRAE (2012)
DIES IRAE (2012)
LABOR INTUS (2014)
LABOR INTUS (2014)
MARE INCOGNITO (2015)
MARE INCOGNITO (2015)

Just as dreams disguise themselves as reality to make themselves recognizable for the consciousness, Dino Valls’ painting conceives his artistic ideas based on the artist’s interior unreality. Neither realism as naturalism, nor a fleeting personal view of the real world concern him. It is not the exterior and its objective reality that attract him, but rather the contrary. This is a search inside oneself, plunging into the warehouse of what underlies everyday experience. In his work, the painter reveals these profound conflicts, and the spectator recognized them as part of his internal struggle, as they belong to the same human essence

Alicia Guixa, Catalogue, “Dino Valls“, Madrid (December 1993)

AURUM (2014)
AURUM (2014)

Oh! Sweet Nuthin’ I’m Sticking With You! VU

Oh! Sweet Nuthin’

Music/Lyrics: Lou Reed  Original Album:Loaded/The Velvet Underground

Oh! Sweet Nuthin‘” is the final song off of Loaded, the last real Velvet Underground album (1970). It tells the stories of the disaffected, the poor Jimmy Brown, the homeless and depressed Ginger Brown, his fellow street person Polly May, and poor Joanna Love who finds herself in an endless stream of failed relationships. Between that and the chorus of, “Oh, sweet nuthin’/She ain’t got nothing’ at all,” you’d think this was a miserable song, one to listen to when you’re looking for that last bit of motivation to slash your wrists. That would be the easy approach. Rather, “Oh! Sweet Nuthin‘” is incredibly life affirming, especially in the end section where drummer Doug Yule – filling in for Moe Tucker who was on maternity leave – suddenly kicks the whole jam into overdrive. The guitars soar and the drumming continues to pound and it builds until it finally resolves to a reprise of, “She ain’t got nothing at all,” which suddenly feels like a reward instead of a lament. Who says that you can’t make something out of nothing? –Mark Toscano, David Steinberg

I’m Sticking With You!

One of the first generally available Velvet Underground bootlegs was an EP released around 1976 that served up four songs cut during the bridges between the band’s second and third (“Temptation in Your Heart”) and third and fourth albums — “Foggy Notion,” “Ferryboat Bill,” and “I’m Sticking With You.” All offered very different views on the band, at a time when the plethora of studio outtakes and oddities that we know today had still to see the light of day. However, even in this company, the plaintively swinging “I’m Sticking With You” (“cos I’m made out of glue”) came as a major shock to anybody raised on the delights of “Sister Ray” and “Heroin.” A straightforward duet between Lou Reed and Maureen Tucker, “I’m Sticking With You” was as sweet and unaffected as any classic pop duo (Captain & Tennille would have killed for this song!), its lilting melody and gauchely realistic sentiments all the more touching for their simplicity. Tucker would subsequently re-record the song with Jonathan Richman; the Velvets’ own version, meanwhile, finally made its official debut on 1985’s VU compilation. –Dave Thompson

Hayley Arjona

Rednecks and Rave Diggers in Pink Wonderland

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Rock’n’Roll Rednecks ”Can’t Get No Satisfactual”
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No Fun
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Whole Lotta Rose
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Bring It Down Hughey, “All the Children Are Insane”
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The Way To a Man’s Heart is Through His Chest
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Introspection
Already Dead
detail to ”Introspection”
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Linoleum
Already Dead
Already Dead
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Because We Can Can

Hayley lives and works on a farm.  Between raising free range pigs and sheep she paints huge psychedelic satirical scenes. Surrounded by big skies and farm land not many can hear the doof doof rumble from from her hay shed studio.

Recent exhibitions by Hayley include; “Rave Diggers” 2015 at The Bearded Tit, Redfern NSW; “A-holeistic Approach” 2015 at Bank Space Gallery, Surry Hills NSW; “Already Dead” 2015 at c3 Gallery Abbotsford Victoria and “Rock ‘N’ Roll Redneck” 2014 at CASPA in Castlemaine Victoria.

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Tattoo design by Hayley Arjona

Read more about Hayley Arjona and Pigs in Space

Marcia Resnick and Victor Bockris

EXCLUSIVE

Questions and Answers About ”NYC Bad Boys” and a Lifetime Partnership

By Tobe Damit
by Tobe Damit

Introduction in Disguise

I will try to, like the Clash album says, ”Cut the Crap” and say that I heard about Victor Bockris the first time through a book called ”Conversation”, which I read avidly the first time it fell in my lap and have re-read a few times. Those Conversations were a goldmine for a Burroughs and Warhol amateur like me who believed that both of them have been to art in general what the Sex Pistols were to music. To me, ”Conversation” is an essential book that should be archived and kept for safety like a mystical artefact, exactly like Burroughs’ paranoid mind would have imagined it; like files that unknown alien forces are constantly updating, thus keeping tabs on the underworld agents. Numbered transcripts sourced and supported by audio, film, and/or photographs, describing meetings between liberating forces from one of the leading underground artistic mind and the Godfather of the surgeons of the Beat Generation, leading to a whole new way of deconstructing and re-creating different realities that were bearers of an extremely particular strain of virus called  PUNK.

Jagger, Burroughs and Warhol by Marcia Resnick, Conversation
Jagger, Burroughs and Warhol by Marcia Resnick in ”Conversation”

I also knew, reading that book, that Victor was already working very closely with Marcia Resnick back then. I followed the timeline traced by her  photos and discovered a whole new world in Resnick’s fascinating images and thoughts, starting with Re-Visions and already seeing that Punks, Poets and Provocateurs that was only released in 2015 (yes! the very day this article was posted!) already was and always has been in the making very early on after the day those two kindred spirits met for the first time. In fact Marcia began the book the same month they both met in September 1977, and finished taking the pictures in 1982. She then worked sporadically on videos of the pictures, showed some of the images in group shows through the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. She also participated in a traveling show, which became a book, called ”Bande A Part, New York Underground 60’s-70’s-80’s’‘ which featured the photographs of many of her contemporaries. This was showcased as a ”travelling show” in venues in Tokyo, Paris, London, Hong Kong, LA and New York, from 2005 to 2009. This was a very positive sign that her work was still alive and growing. In 2010, she had a one-woman show of her vintage portraits from the 1977 to 1982 period at the Deborah Bell Photographs in NYC. It was also in 2010 Marcia and Victor began to ”physically” put the book together. The result is a shared vision of the world that is exposed through a sincere, honest, disarming, straightforward series of photos, poems, thoughts, paintings and a variety of ways and any possible means to recreate the feelings attached to those vivid memories. Each of those forever preserved time capsules humbling me, reminding me of how fragile some of us are or were, especially some of those NYC Bad Boys, but also revealing how our weaknesses are non-dissociative parts of our inner beauty.

Victor Bockris and Marcia Resnick
Victor Bockris and Marcia Resnick

No need to say I was delighted when I was asked to do an article about Punk, Poets and Provocateurs in an interview format. Marcia and Victor were kind enough to gently respond to some questions I had in mind after I got the chance to read and feel ”Punks, Poets & Provocateurs: NYC Bad Boys, 1977-1982” that is righteously presented here as the triumphant accomplishment of a lifetime collaboration between two artist I admire so much. I sincerely hope you enjoy it as much as I did!!

LAN: ”How did you two met?”

Victor Bockris: ”We met at an opening of a photo show at the Andrew Crispo gallery in September 1977. And spent the next six weeks talking and running around town meeting all sorts of people. I helped Marcia collect back cover quotations for “Re-Visions” and published “Why I Hate My Girlfriend” about her in High Times in 1978. Fuelled by love and hate.”

LAN: Do you think the term Bad Boy is as appealing to the general public as it was in the 60s and the 70s? Has anything changed?”

Victor Bockris: ”Bad Boys is a generic term which has lost most of its meaning. That’s why we changed the title from Bad Boys to “Punks, Poets and Provocateurs” which had previously been her sub-title. Although Marcia does a good job defining the Counterculture’s Bad Boy Icon in her outstanding texts. ”

LAN: ”Do you see some of them as angels with broken wings?”

John Lydon
John Lydon by Marcia Resnick

Marcia Resnick: ”I see Bad Boys as rebels of attitudes and codes who often shake things up in the best way.”

LAN: ”Do you still find inspiration in your old friendships and acquaintances? You must have developed special everlasting relationships with some people!”

Marcia Resnick: ”We know the people we used to hang out with and love and support them. We are always overjoyed to see them, like veterans of a war. We definitely find inspiration in all our living and departed friends.”

LAN: ”It’s a well-known cliché to say that most good artists have suffered a lot, and somehow channeled this suffering and/or anxiety through their art. Do you consider you went through that too?”

Marcia Resnick: ”Art is an act of confronting what distresses you most and overcoming the distress by turning it into art.”

LAN: ”Has it ever happened to you that on the moment something appeared to be a bad thing, but you later came to realise it was in fact a good thing?”

Marcia Resnick: ”Contradiction is one basis of creativity. Challenges that appear to be bad are often very good for you. This can also be said about artistic mistakes.”

LAN: ”Do you consider yourselves more as Poets, Punks or Provocateurs or none of the above? If none of the above, how do you consider yourselves if you had to pick one or few words?”

Both: ”Punk Poet!”

LAN: ”What do you think Burroughs and Ginsberg (and by extension the Beat Generation) brought to the punk scene? Do you think they fit into that equation?”

Victor Bockris: ”The punk scene shone a light of affection and affiliation on the Beat scene. Allen and Bill lived in the midst of a punk neighbourhood, the Lower East Side. Punk was neo-beat.

LAN: ”What about The Velvet Underground?”

Victor Bockris: ”The Velvets were the archetypal punk band. Lou Reed was the most important person who visited CBGB’s. He supported punk from the outset. Punks loved Lou.”

Joey Ramone by Marcia Resnick
Joey Ramone by Marcia Resnick

LAN: ”Punk was about industry, not virtuosity.” Could you expand on what you meant by that?”

Victor Bockris: ”Punks worked very hard to make beautiful music. This industry was inspired by passion and could be accomplished with a DIY attitude as opposed to a stringent technically proficient prowess.”

LAN: ”With everything that is going right now and the overall empowerment of the world by the 1%, do you think that we would need to return back to the sources with a very simple, bold, loud, clear and shall I say even aggressive message that was the very essence of Punk Rock?”

Victor Bockris: ”I think we need to bring back the counterculture as a global force for humanity.”

LAN: ”Do you find that everything is more diluted today? Do you think that the messages delivered by today’s artists are as strong today as they were in the 60s and the 70s?”

Victor Bockris: ”Artists of the 50s 60s 70s were all connected by the umbrella of protest against the atrocities of WWII. Passionate realism is the key. Post 83 or so the people have no single ring to fight against.”

LAN: ”Do you think sex should be a hidden thing or more out in the open like in Japan? I’m asking because you represent both sexes and have lived as adults in a period Pre-AIDS and without shame but you also know what shame is… You also lived in an era in which homosexuality and transexuality were illegal. I’m thinking for example of Candy Darling, and Lou Reed who received I think 19 (if not more) shock treatments just because he had gay THOUGHTS.”

Marcia Resnick: ”Sex is like God. It’s the greatest thing that ever happened but its been co-opted by same people who say God is on our side. Nobody owns sex but a lot of people exploit it, like the Catholic Church or the Sex Industry. Obviously do what thou wilt is all of the law. Everything is permitted. Sex is good. No laws against sex are recognized in the magic universe.”

LAN: ”If you could talk to the young ”you(s)” when you were 15, what would you say to yourself?”

Marcia Resnick: ”Focus on learning how to live the artistic ways of life. It has great benefits but if you don’t know how to live it doesn’t make much difference”

LAN: ”Do you consider yourself a survivor? If so, what or who made you able to overcome what could have been your downfall?”

Marcia Resnick: ”Collaboration. We have helped each other survive by working to a united end on this book.”

LAN: ”The 1977 Blackout in New-York was seen as a turning point by many people because they were seeing judges and doctors turning into looters in the anonymity provided by the dark. Were you there? If yes did it have any effect on you at the time?”

Marcia Resnick: ”Sounds like a fantasy! The July 77 NY Blackout heralded a great new period because everybody walking around in Greenwich Village was exhilarated to see each other and was full of joy! People were conversing with people they didn’t know!”

LAN: ”What beauty have you ever witnessed coming out of what some would describe as a wreckage?

Marcia & Mick
Marcia & Mick

Marcia Resnick: ”Andy Warhol, Keith Richard. Lou Reed, William Burroughs for starters.”

LAN: ”This one I guess goes out more to Victor. Since Warhol himself was always taping and taking pictures, did you feel at times that you were interviewing the interviewer??”

Victor Bockris: ”I learned about how to do interviews from Andy Warhol. I cannot understand why a book of his interviews has never been published. I wrote the first draft of “Exposures” with him. He had an enormous influence as a writer which has been strangely subdued.”

LAN: ”Since we are talking about Warhol, I was curious to find out if you saw a change in Warhol after he was shot by Solanas?”

Victor Bockris: ”Everybody says that his presence was everything before he was shot. It took him a long time to recover, but the man I met in the mid seventies had more energy than anyone. It made him cautious about hanging out with hard-core people. He really bloomed in the early 80s painting with Jean-Michel (Basquiat).”

Andy Warhol by Marcia Resnick
Andy Warhol by Marcia Resnick

LAN: ”Have you ever been personally the victim of a blatant injustice?”

Victor Bockris: ”No. I avoid policemen and lawyers. It is dangerous to get involved with them.”

LAN: ”Any words of advice for the generations to come?”

Marcia Resnick: ”Collaboration is the Key to Life. You can go into any field you want to, from poetry to the law, but your chance of success will always be much greater if you find other people or another person to do it with.”

Marcia Resnick
Marcia Resnick

”Punks, Poets & Provocateurs: NYC Bad Boys, 1977-1982” by Marcia Resnick and Victor Bockris is now available in the nearest bookstore!!  

Book signing with Photographer Marcia Resnick Punks, Poets and Provocateurs: New York City Bad Boys, 1977–1982 by Marcia Resnick and Victor Bockris Published by Insight Editions Tuesday, November 10, 2015 6:30–8:30 PM / Admission free! Click on picture below for a lot more infos on related events to come!

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Johnny Thunder and Cheetah Chrome by Marcia Resnick. Click on image for details!

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The Boston Tea Party VU 1967

ANDY WARHOL SHOOTS THE VELVET UNDERGROUND LIVE IN COLOR, BOSTON, 1967

UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1966: Andy Warhol in New York, United States in 1966 - Andy Warhol with the Velvet Underground, from left to right: John Cale, Andy Warhol, Nico, Gerard Malanga. (Photo by Herve GLOAGUEN/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES – CIRCA 1966: Andy Warhol in New York, United States in 1966 – Andy Warhol with the Velvet Underground, from left to right: John Cale, Andy Warhol, Nico, Gerard Malanga. (Photo by Herve GLOAGUEN/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

Last week I recovered video of the Velvet Underground performing live in Boston in 1967. This would be notable on its own, being one of only two known films with synchronous sound of the band performing live also happens to be the only one that was shot in color, but what makes it really significant is that this  was filmed by Andy Warhol himself.

Early promo posters referred to the show as the “Erupting Plastic Inevitable”. This soon changed to “The Exploding Plastic Inevitable”. This clip Warhol shot features a variety of filmmaking techniques. Sudden in-and-out zooms, sweeping panning shots, in-camera edits that create single frame images and bursts of light like paparazzi flash bulbs going off mirror the kinesthetic experience of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable, with its colorful slide shows, multi-screen projections of 16 mm film projections, combined with a stroboscopic-light show designed by Danny Williams (because of the punishing lights, the band took to wearing sunglasses onstage), whip dancers, liberal use of amphetamines, and overpowering sound.

The Boston Tea Party venue with its distinctive arched inscription reading
The Boston venue with its distinctive arched inscription reading “PRAISE YE THE LORD”, remaining from the hall’s original use.

The Boston Tea Party was a concert venue located at 53 Berkeley Street (later relocated to 15 Lansdowne Street in the former site of competitor, the Ark) in the South End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. It operated from 1967 to early 1971. Its closing was due in part to the increasing cost of hiring bands who were playing more and more at large outdoor festivals and arena rock concerts. The venue became associated with the psychedelic movement, being similar in this way to other contemporary rock halls such as New York‘sFillmore East and Electric Circus, San Francisco‘s Fillmore West, and Philadelphia‘s Electric Factory.

The Velvet Underground, not widely known or appreciated in their own time, played regularly to a packed house at the Boston Tea Party. According to the club’s former manager, Steve Nelson, “People in Boston just adopted them, and that ranges from Harvard graduate students to tough kids from the neighborhood…and that really was the start of their, I guess we could call it a residency.”

 “This is our favorite place to play in the whole country.”—Lou Reed, December 12, 1968

The quality is poor, but snatches of classics like “Run Run Run” and “Guess I’m Falling In Love” can be made out in the first half of the video. The second half of the half-hour clip is filled by a complete performance of the immortal “Sister Ray.” This is an amazing historical and artistic document from the year the The Velvet Underground & Nico came out. Watch the extremely rare moment in musical history below.

The Cramps

LIVE –  NAPA MENTAL STATE HOSPITAL

On June 13, 1978, Garage punk band The Cramps gave a free concert at the California State Mental Hospital in Napa. It is, simply put, one of the single greatest rock and roll experiments ever captured on videotape (in this case, on a half-inch open reel Sony Portapak by Joe Rees and his Target Video outfit). Also on the bill were The Mutants from San Francisco. One hundred years from now  I hope this video will be not considered so outraging and that people who have mental health problems will no longer be ostracized from the rest of society. This was done with utmost respect to the patients, hope you watch it with that respectful point of view too.

Artists Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard meticulously recreated this event (and the video itself) as an elaborate art project at the ICA in London in 2003. Forsyth and Pollard’s “Cramps” also performed in front of an audience comprised of psychiatric patients in their “File Under Sacred Music” re-staging of the infamous 1978 gig.

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                        The Cramps are (were) Lux Interior (RIP) and Poison Ivy.

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Arākī

Tokyo Lucky Hole

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Notorious in his native Japan for his challenging, emotionally raw images and explicit depictions of sexuality and mortality, Nobuyoshi Araki has courted controversy for the last five decades.

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Simultaneously erotic and historical, Araki reflects Japan’s unique combination of strict tradition and constant innovation. His fascination with Tokyo is manifest in his work, delving into the traditions, riotous nightlife and impish child’s play of this fluctuating metropolis, alongside intimate, impromptu and candid moments with the photographer, his compatriots and his egotistical ‘genius’ alter-ego. Araki’s lustrous portraits of friends and lovers employ highly stylised compositions, vibrant colours, and the plastic toys of our disposable society to reference the overt commercialism of Japanese society. Araki_15

 

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Araki’s most notable contribution to the photography canon is his pioneering conception of ‘i-photography’, an autobiographical but fictive account of life and death through his images. In Sentimental Journey and later in Winter Journey Araki documented both the intimate and the mundane from his honeymoon and his wife’s terminal battle with cancer. By blurring the boundaries between life and art Araki’s work becomes uncomfortably candid, presenting death with a reverence as shocking and graphic as any of his more erotic material.

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ARAKI Nobuyoshi Untitled

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Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme

One weird little elf.

01   Born in Santa Monica, California, Lynette Alice Fromme grew up in Westchester, California where her father William worked as an aeronautical engineer. Lyn was the first of 3 children, was a talented, well-liked child that toured throughout the United States and Canada in a song and dance troop called the Lariats. In Junior High School Lynette was active with many after school activities. She was a member of the Athenian Honor Societyas well as the Girls Athletic Club. In her drama class Lyn befriended a young Phil Hartman, who eventually gained fame on shows like Saturday Night Live, The Simpsons, & Newsradio. When her class gave out superlatives, Lynette was voted “Personality Plus”.  images (1)

As Lyn grew older, the relationship between her and her father grew apart. Neighbors remembered William Fromme as a tyrant-like figure, who seemed to punish Lyn for little or nothing at all. In High School, Lynette became more rebellious, using drugs and alcohol. She worked in a Canvas shop where coworkers would see Lyn burn herself with lit cigarettes, and shoot staples into her forearm with a staple gun. She briefly dated Bill Siddons, who went on to be the road manager of The Doors. However, Siddons’ mother felt that Lyn was disturbed, and talked Bill into steering clear of her. After High School, Lynette bounced around, living with different people. She eventually moved back home and enrolled at El Camino Junior College. It wasn’t long before Lyn and her father were fighting again.  lynette_squeaky_fromme

The two got into a fight over a definition of a word, and it was the last straw for Lynette; again, she hit the road. It was at this time, that Lyn met Charles Manson on Venice Beach. Impressed by Manson, she quickly decided to leave Los Angeles to travel with Charlie and Mary Brunner Lynette had a special spot in the family; according to Paul Watkins, no one but Charlie was allowed to sleep with Lyn. At Spahn’s Ranch, Fromme spent most of her time taking care of the 80 year-old blind owner, George Spahn. Lynette would make squeak-like noises when George ran his hands up her legs, so he dubbed her “Squeaky.” Lynette was arrested with the family in both the Spahn and Barker Ranch raids. During the Tate-La Bianca murder trial Lyn was frequently arrested. The charges ranged from contempt of court, loitering, trespassing on county property, to attempted murder, for a LSD lanced hamburger given to Barbara Hoyt in Hawaii.  images

After Manson was convicted, Squeaky moved to San Francisco to be closer to San Quentin. She maintained contact with defense attorney Paul Fitzgerald, and family members in and out of jail. However, prison officials were uncomfortable about her and wouldn’t permit her to see Charlie. When Lyn wasn’t petitioning to see Manson, she began writing a book about the family. In September of 1972, Lynette was arrested in connection with the murders of James and Reni Willet. Authorities soon found she wasn’t involved with the murders, however they were reluctant to let her go. Finally on January 2nd 1973, all charges against Lyn were dropped, and she was released the following day. On her release Lynette was immediately arrested by LAPD. She had been accused of robbing a 7-11 convenience store in October of 1972. At the trial Lyn’s accuser, a 17 year-old 7-11 employee, admitted that the robber didn’t have the “X” scar on her forehead. Once again the charges weren’t dropped until another woman was arrested and confessed to the crime. Freedom was bittersweet for Lyn, the Family was falling apart. Mary, Gypsy, Katie, Leslie, and Sadie all wanted nothing to do with Manson.

Later that year, Lynette moved to Sacramento with Sandra Good. The reason for the move was once again to be closer to Manson; Charlie had been moved from San Quentin to Folsom Prison. While walking in a park Fromme befriended a 64 year-old man named Harold “Manny” Boro. According to Boro’s daughter-in-law, the two were lovers. In Sacramento, Lyn and Sandy became more preoccupied with saving the environment. It was around this time that Charlie started to talk about the Order of the Rainbow, his own religion in which Lyn and Sandy would be nuns of. Each of the Manson girls was given a color; Lynette was dubbed “Red” and was given the duty of saving the Redwoods. Their Lifestyles would be very different compared to the Spahn’s Ranch days. The girls weren’t allowed to smoke, have sex, or watch “movies with violence that sets thoughts to death and confusion.” From their P Street apartment, Lyn and Sandy started the International People’s Court of Retribution; a fictitious terrorist group that would assassinate executives and CEO’s of companies that polluted the earth. The two sent out hundreds of threatening letters that claimed that there were thousands of members of the terrorist group just waiting to kill.

In this never-before-published police photo released September 3, 1976 by the Sacramento Bee, Lynette Fromme is shown in an interrogation room shortly after her capture, with an empty holster still strapped to her leg. On September 5, 1975, Fromme attempted to assassinate President Ford with a gun outside the California Capitol. She was later convicted and sent to federal prison. (AP Photo/Police Handout via Sacramento Bee)
In this never-before-published police photo released September 3, 1976 by the Sacramento Bee, Lynette Fromme is shown in an interrogation room shortly after her capture, with an empty holster still strapped to her leg. On September 5, 1975, Fromme attempted to assassinate President Ford with a gun outside the California Capitol.

While trying to get the local news to report the damage being done to the Redwoods from logging, Lyn was informed that the President of the United States was coming to town. On September 5, 1975, Lynette headed down to Capital Park with a loaded Colt .45 automatic pistol (borrowed from Manny Boro) strapped to her leg. When President Gerald Ford came walking down the path, Lynette pulled out her gun. Immediately Secret Service Agents wrestled Lyn to the ground, and the President escaped untouched. At her trial, Lynette followed Charlie’s example and chose to represent herself. However, her presence in the courtroom was short-lived. When Lyn lectured about the Redwoods and her other environmental concerns, Judge Thomas McBride instructed Lyn to stick to things relevant to her case. As Lyn continued to talk about whales and pollution, McBride had her removed from the courtroom. Squeaky was returned to her jail cell, where she spent most of the trial, watching from closed circuit television. Later on in the case, and nearly costing a mistrial, it was discovered that U.S. Attorney Dwayne Keyes had failed to turn over some exculpatory evidence. In late November of 1975, a jury convicted Lynette of Attempted Assassination of the President of the United States of America. Upon sentencing, an angry Lynette threw an apple at Dwayne Keyes’ head, after which Squeaky was sentenced to Life. Squeaky was sent away to the Alderson Federal Corrections Institute in West Virginia. She was eventually reconnected with fellow family member Sandy Good, after she was transferred to a new prison in Pleasanton, California, where Good was serving time for sending threatening letters.

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In March of 1979, Lynette attacked a Croatian Nationalist named Julienne Busic, imprisoned from her connection in a 1976 airline hijacking. Squeaky hit Busic in the head with the claw end of a hammer, got 15 months added to her sentence, and was sent back to Alderson. On December 23, 1987, Lyn got word that Charlie was dying of cancer, and escaped from Alderson. She was picked up 2 days later having traveled only a few miles. Squeaky then bounced around the prison system: from Lexington, Kentucky, to Marianna, Florida, and finally to the Federal Medical Center Carswell, near Fort Worth, Texas where she remained until her release on August 16, 2009.

Drama documentary featuring input from Linda Kasabian, Catherine Share & Vincent Bugliosi. It covers the murders of Gary Hinmen and the Tate-LaBianca slayings. I do not hold the copyright to this documentary. It is to my personal taste the best made documentary about it. Blunt, true, visceral. Until then, Kasabian was still in hiding and still afraid because she was receiving threats by supporters of the Manson family. The very thing you can be resented more than to be a child killer (if possible!) is being a snitch in the underworld where she resentfully takes us.

Wayne Martin Belger’s Transcendent Art

Chambers of Pure Enlightment

 Photo by Laura Morton
The artist/photographer photographed by Laura Morton

To judge by price at auction and in galleries, and its popularity through museum exhibits, books and photo fairs, fine art photography is now in the lofty realms of well, fine art. Granted these aren’t grandma’s snapshots of birthdays and vacation landscapes, but rather images from classicists like Diane Arbus, Jacques Henri Lartigue and Weegee who capture moments, people and places with both their eyes and techniques; outsiders like Miroslav Tichy who organically created his voyeuristic single print photographs with cameras made from discarded objects he discovered on the Czech streets like cans, boxes and eyeglasses, decorating with doodles the resulting work which originally created was only for himself; and Andreas Gursky who are redefining the genre through use of stitching, pixilation and other digital manipulation. Wayne Martin Belger‘s photographs and intricate, one-of-kind, hand-built cameras — themselves works of art, often set with gemstones and talismans; crafted with human organs and skulls, blood, bones and blood — boldly combine both the ancient and post-modern, using a viewing method that can be traced as far back as China in the 5th century B.C., to Aristotle, Euclid, and later Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) who refined the technique in his the 10th Century Book of Optics, before emerging as in 1850 as photographic device. The process begins with Belger first desiring to explore and relate to a concept and envisioning the photographs, then crafting a camera as the portal into the subject. He collects artifacts, relics and metals, and painstakingly builds the device with parts he carefully machines, the construction itself a form of meditation on and communion with the concepts and images, much like icon painters who first pray and meditate, then carefully prepare the surface, blend the tempera and delicately layer the colors. Using 4×5 film and existing light, Belger can spend anywhere from 10 seconds to 90 minutes with the pinhole aperture open to capture a single shot in the camera designed specifically for a series, with the goal “to be the sacred bridge of a communion offering between myself and the subject. All to witness and be a tool of the horrors of creation and the beauty of decay presented by the author of light and time.” To compare and contrast, 35mm movie film runs 24 frames per second, while high-speed digital still cameras can shoot 60 frames per second. With the emulsion film exposed for extended periods, Belger’s photographs become movies distilled onto a single frame. Photons from the stationary object of focus, as well as moving objects in the field, are absorbed onto the emulsion, creating softened, at times ghost-like, images.

Belger: With pinhole photography, the same air that touches my subject can pass through the pinhole and touch the photo emulsion on the film. There’s no barrier between the two. There are no lenses changing and manipulating light. There are no chips converting light to binary code. With pinhole what you get is an unmanipulated true representation of a segment of light and time, a pure reflection of what is at that moment.

Belger: The tools I create and work with are pinhole cameras. With pinhole photography, the same air that touches my subject can pass through the pinhole and touch the photo emulsion on the film. There’s no barrier between the two. There are no lenses changing and manipulating light. There are no chips converting light to binary code. With pinhole what you get is an unmanipulated true representation of a segment of light and time, a pure reflection of what is at that moment. With some exposure times getting close to 2 hours, it’s an unsegmented movie from a movie camera with only one frame. The creation of a camera comes from my desire to relate to a subject. When I choose a subject I spend time studying it. Then I start visualizing how I would like a photo of the subject to look. When that’s figured out, I start on the camera stage of the project by collecting parts, artifacts and relics that relate to the subject. When I’ve gathered enough parts and feel for the subject, I start the construction of the camera. I create the cameras from Aluminum, Titanium, Copper, Brass, Bronze, Steel, Silver, Gold, Wood, Acrylic, Glass, Horn, Ivory, Bone, Human Bone, Human Skulls, Human Organs, Formaldehyde, HIV+ Blood and relics all designed to be the sacred bridge of a communion offering between myself and the subject. All to witness and be a tool of the horrors of creation and the beauty of decay presented by the author light and time.

The Third Eye Camera:

third eye cam
Designed to study the beauty of decay. 4”x5” camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Brass, Silver, Gem Stones and a 150 year old skull of a 13 year old girl. Light and time enters at the third eye, exposing the film in the middle of the skull.

3rdeye_quarter 3rd_eye-side Astonishing results: Can you see some weird ghostly face formed in the Third Eye Camera ”bright chamber”? Creepy? Maybe. That’s a very narrow minded way to see the whole concept. I bet that this ghostly face alone by itself was worth all the efforts that putting that camera together required. This little girl is going to be able to see images in her own skull again.  Maybe it was her way of saying Hello!! and THANK YOU!!! The concept of this camera and the images it produces are to my humble opinion so out of this world!! I bet William Gibson and especially Burroughs would have loved this shit!!!!

San Francisco - 11"x14" gelatin silver print from Polaroid negative
San Francisco – 11″x14″ gelatin silver print from Polaroid negative
Two Hearts 11"x14" gelatin silver print (from Roadside Altar series)
Two Hearts – 11″x14″ gelatin silver print (from Roadside Altar series).
Third Eye Photo Install
Third Eye Photo Install

Yama (Tibetan Skull Camera)

Designed for the study of exodus and for the research of modern incarnations of historical iconic figures. “Yama,” the Tibetan God of Death. In Tibetan Buddhism, Yama will see all of life and Karma is the “judge” that keeps the balance. The skull was blessed by a Tibetan Lama for its current journey and I’m working with a Tibetan legal organization that is sending me to the refugee cities in India.is carefully crafted from the 500-year-old skull of a Tibetan monk and retro-fitted with copper, aluminum and brass camera pieces machined by Belger, who painstakingly placed the camera’s dual pinholes in the exact position of the pupils. The camera’s internal mechanism is split, producing two exact images that when printed and viewed at a distance become three-dimensional. The skull is set with sterling silver and gems including several large rubies over the pineal gland/third eye, plus sapphires, opals, and turquoise. It rests in a large gilt-edged mirrored box, reminiscent of a memento mori, fittingly as Yama is the Tibetan god of death. The box sits atop a silk prayer cloth on a wooden table; below, a plumb/pendulum of brass filled with artist’s blood and mercury swings over a container of pearls and sand, a stunning installation that unites and transcends the concepts of form and function. This all might sound a bit morbid, but Yama’s countenance smiles knowingly, cheerily from his glass box, eager to be readied for his work. Or simply to be admired. yama_front yama_side2 Yama’s eyes are cast from bronze and silver with a brass pinhole in each. A divider runs down the middle of the skull creating two separate cameras. A finished contact print mounted on copper is inserted in to the back of the camera to view what Yama saw in 3D. yama_side-close yama_workings Yama is made from Aluminium, Titanium, Copper, Brass, Bronze Steel, Silver, Gold, Mercury with 4 Sapphires, 3 Rubies (The one at Yama’s third eye was $5000.00), Asian and American Turquoise, Sand, Blood, and 9 Opals inlayed in the Skull. The film loading system is pneumatic. A 360 psi air tank in the middle of the camera powers 2 pneumatic pistons to move the film holder forward and lock it into place. The switch to open and close the film chamber is located under the jaw. yama_eye yama_side-close2 Designed for two photo series. First series is of my interpretation of the modern incarnation of Southeast Asians deities. Second will take place in the Tibetan refugee cities of India, a home-coming through the eyes of a 500-year-old Tibetan. Picture taken:

Kali - 32"x40" toned gelatin silver print subject painted with Prickly Pair Black tea.
Kali – 32″x40″ toned gelatin silver print
subject painted with Prickly Pair Black tea.
Magdaline - 11"x14" toned gelatin silver print
Magdaline – 11″x14″ toned gelatin silver print

Untouchable (HIV Camera)

Designed to study and photograph a geographic comparison of people suffering from HIV. For “Blood Works” his exploration and study of HIV/AIDS, Belger created the “Untouchable (HIV),” camera using aluminum, copper, titanium and acrylic. HIV+ blood from one of Belger’s friends-the blood is treated with heparin sulfate to prevent coagulation-pumps through the camera then in front of the pinhole, becoming a #25 red filter. For shooting with “Untouchable,” Belger holds opens calls, and has captured a wide range of HIV+ people across the United States, with plans to photograph HIV+/AIDS subjects throughout Africa this upcoming spring in advance of his participation in a December 2012 group show at the Royal Ontario Museum, which will also include his Third Eye, Yama and Heart cameras and the photos they produce. The show also features works from Joel Peter Witkin, Steven Gregory, Marc Quinn (whose models include Buck Angel and whose sculpture “Alison Lapper Pregnant” was installed in Trafalgar Square), Robert Krasnow, WhiteFeather, Francois Robert, Weiki Somers, Charles LeDray, Rosamond Purcell and Mark Prent. Belger produces a limited number of prints, usually fewer than 10 of each shot. Collectors of the unique, intricate devices receive one of each print along with the camera that created them, with the agreement that Belger can borrow back the camera to continue the series. In exchange they receive a copy of each new print. Other aficionados collect only the ethereal images. hiv_left 4″x5″ camera made from Aluminium, Copper, Titanium, Acrylic and HIV positive blood. The blood pumps through the camera then in front of the pinhole and becomes my #25 red filter. Designed to shoot a geographic comparison of people suffering from HIV.

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Untouchable HIV Photo Install

 Yemaya (Underwater Camera)

Now I am aware that the concept on this one might seem less ”original” and I realise it,s far from being the first underwater camera but I still chose to show that one simply for the love of bold surreal chromed, sorta Captain Nemo look of this camera and reminds me of how great are the capabilities of Wayne Martin Belger not ONLY as an artist, but also as a crafty camera builder technician. This camera is as functional as it is truly magnificent.

4"x5" underwater pinhole camera made from Aluminium, Acrylic, Brass, Sea creatures and Pearls. An altar to the Santeria Goddess of the ocean, Yemaya, is inside the back of the camera.
4″x5″ underwater pinhole camera made from Aluminium, Acrylic, Brass, Sea creatures and Pearls. An altar to the Santeria Goddess of the ocean, Yemaya, is inside the back of the camera.

yemaya_side2 yemaya_side yemaya_back yemaya_back-close Underwater photos:

"The Valiant" - First photo from Yemaya, off the coast of Catalina Island, depicting a sunken ship at 105 ft. deep. The exposure was 1 and a half hours long. 20"x24" C-print.
“The Valiant” – First photo from Yemaya, off the coast of Catalina Island, depicting a sunken ship at 105 ft. deep. The exposure was 1 and a half hours long. 20″x24″ C-print.
Catalina - 120"x24" C-print
Catalina – 120″x24″ C-print

Heart Camera

Last but not least… This project documents mothers who are at least eight months pregnant. The 4×5 pinhole camera created for the project contains the heart of a child who died at birth. The heart, donated by a gallery owner who found it among a collection of old anatomy equipment, is preserved in a sealed compartment at the rear of the camera. Despite its chilling reminder of the risks of childbirth, Belger says he was surprised by how well the mothers took to the Heart camera. Word about his project spread fast, with expecting mothers now contacting the photographer to set a date. So far Belger has photographed portraits of 30 women so far. He’s even been invited to photograph women giving birth. Belger is able to capture only one frame, about a ten-minute exposure, and begins to expose the film just before his subject gives birth. heart_front1

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Designed to take photos of soon-to-be mothers who are at least 8 months pregnant, and explore my relationship with my twin brother who died at birth. 4″x5″ camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Acrylic, Formaldehyde and an infant human heart.
Designed to take photos of soon-to-be mothers who are at least 8 months pregnant, and explore my relationship with my twin brother who died at birth. 4"x5" camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Acrylic, Formaldehyde and an infant human heart.
Designed to take photos of soon-to-be mothers who are at least 8 months pregnant, and explore my relationship with my twin brother who died at birth.
4″x5″ camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Acrylic, Formaldehyde and an infant human heart.

 Some Photos Taken with The Heart Camera:

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Belger’s beautiful machines and the photographs he produces with them are stunning, surreal, yet incredibly grounded and visceral expressions of the artist’s and subjects’ place in time and light, and our brief time and place on earth.

MAIN LINK TO WAYNE MARTIN BELGER WEBSITE

9 /11 Deer – Wood Dragonfly – Altar  Classic

boyofblue@yahoo.com
 By Tobe Damit
By Tobe Damit

The Thin White Duke

The Side Effects of the Cocaïne

DAVID BOWIE 01 APRIL 1975 – 02 FEBRUARY 1976

WRITER SEAN T. COLLINS
ARTIST ISAAC MOYLAN

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If that flyer of ”Sound” in Berlin, here labelled as ”the most modern discothèque in Europe” means something to you, try clicking on it and then try to find the same image in the clip.

The Sound

Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell

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An extract from YOUR PRETTY FACE IS GOING TO HELL by Dave Thompson:

 Aylesbury Friars would be Bowie‘s final show for a month, before he headed into the studios first and then Mott the Hoople. It was also designed to be Bowie’s introduction to an American press that MainMan had flown in for the occasion, writers and taste makers who had read so much about the new British superstar in the imported papers, but where still waiting  to be convinced themselves.

téléchargementThe Spiders’ U.S. tour was now scheduled for September 1972, and if all went according to MainMan’s plan, reviews and reports from the Aylesbury show would see the excitement reaching fever pitch right around the time of the first concert. 

    On Saturday July 15th, wined and dined at the height of luxury, lodged in the finest hotels, and shepherded every place they needed to go, the American journalists felt like royalty as they were driven into the leafy confines of Aylesbury ushered into the Friars club-and confronted with an audience that was even more rabid than the British press reports  had ever warned them. Boisterous though they most have been, and determined to remain aloof, that first rush ofadrenalined shrieking caught them off guard, sending their ears reeling before they’d even found a place to stand. Then their eyes took over, bombarding their senses with the sight of a thousand wide-eyed Bowie clones, Angela doubles,Ronson doppelgangers. 

Ziggy Ronson

     ”Ode to Joy” piped throught the PA, Loud enough to shake coherent thought from their heads, but not deafening as to be painful, and then the band appeared, ripping straight into ”Hang Onto Yourself”, and all reservations fell away. The show was stunning, the performances seamless, and when Bowie started throwing his silk scarves into the crowd, the writers were as desparate to catch them as the kids.

     The Lou Reed show the previous evening had been a revelation. Taking the stage shortly after midnight and kicking right into a deliciously clunky ”White Night White Heat”, Reed was at his best, a spectral ring-leader, not quite ad-libbing his lyrics but certainly having a wonderful time teasing the Tots with his timing, and if he was the only person in the room who didn’t cringe a little when the band unleashed their backing vocals, that didn’t detract from the sheer thrill of seeing him up there.

  ”Waiting for my man”, layered with flourishes that the song had never before carried; a resonant ”Ride into the Sun”; a fragile ”New Age”, Reed singing instead of mumbling as expected,; on and on through the best of Lou Reed and the finest of the Velvet Underground, Reed may have been leading the crowd into unchartered territory for much of the set, but the roar that greeted ”Sweet Jane” was as heartfelt as the smile with which Reed repaid the recognition.”I Can’t Stand It” was punchy, ”Going Down” was gentle,”Wild Child” was brittle, ”Berlin” was beautiful, and if ”Rock’n’Roll” picked up more appplause than the eerie, closing ”Heroin”, that just proved how much easier it was to find Loaded in a British record store than any of the records that preceded it.

The Stooges would really need to be on form to top that.  Again the show started after midnight, allowing the handful of Bowie fans who’d also hit Aylesbury to race back in time for the Stooge’s, together with all the journalists who accepted MainMan’s offer of a bus back into London. A few of them might have thought they knew what to expect, nursing memories of the shows the band had played back in New-York a couple of years before. But they left their expectations on the dance floor. Mick Jones, four years away from forming the Clash at the birth of the British punk movmement, was there, astonished by the incandescence of the show. ”The full-on quality of the Stooges was great, like flamethrowers!”

       Iggy lived up to his outrageous reputation, dressing in silver leather trousers, with matching silver hair, black lipstick and made-up eyes. After lurching and prowling over every inch of the stage in the first two numbers, he decided to wander into audience, followed where possible by spotlight. He stopped occasionally to stare deep into people’s eyes, talking about wanting to find something “interesting” and calling the crowd hippies that didn’t inspire him.Pop was everywhere trailing a mix cord the length of the building as he wandered out into the audience, alternately grabbing and caressing whoever lay in his path. One girl discovered him sitting in her lap, staring into her eyes as he serenaded her; one boy found himself being shaken like a rat as Pop grabbed hold of his head and used it to cath the rythm of the song. At some point, there was a problem with the sound. Pop stood still for a moment, stock-still and scowling, then howled with rage  and hurled his mic to the ground. It shattered on impact., so he walked to another one, and treated the silent crowd to ”The Shadow of your smile” a suave accapella that kept everyone entranced while the problems were solved. Then it was back to the programmed set, loud, lewd and brutal.   The concert was attended by a group of noisy skinhead types, who voiced their impatience during one of several breaks due to technical problems, which caused Iggy to respond, “What did you say, you piece of shit,” as he advanced threateningly across the stage. The cat-caller’s memory suddenly failed him as he melted back into the crowd.  After the microphone was fixed, the Stooges commenced another song but halfway through one of the amplifiers broke down, causing a long delay. Later in the show, the leader of the skinhead gang went down to the front of the stage to shout obscenities. This time, Iggy went berserk, leaping across the stage to aim a boot in the guy’s face. Roadies pounced on the guy and bundled him out of a side exit; the rest of the mob shut up completely. 

     ”We did a bunch of things that were new and we started wearing lots of makeup for one thing.and that was different, Williamson recalled. II think we had rehearsed pretty much by that point. It didn’t seem unique to me. We did a lot of stuff with the crowd at that show, which was bizarre for the Londoner, but it was typical for us. That’s what we were used to doing.”

They took Pop’s activities in stride, It was part of the show, but we had to really cover a lot for him because he was very improvisational, as was the whole band. We knew, but if you weren’t used to it, you didn’t know when he was going to start a song or when it was going to stop or what to do in the middle because it wasnt exactly youd recorded it. He was very unpredictableIggyPopRawPowerCover1972(c)MickRock

    In attendance at the King’s Cross Cinema were several aspiring musicians, who would go on to become highly influential in the British punk rock movement which exploded a few years later, including Joe Strummer (the Clash), Johnny Rotten (the Sex Pistols), Brian James (the Damned), and Siouxsie Sioux (Siouxsie and the Banshees). The concert has been called the birth of British punk rock. “That show changed the history of English music, because of who was there,” notes Iggy. “People checked us out and realised we had changed the playing field for what was possible.” 

   The Stooges drew predominantly positive reviews, although it was obvious that they made the British critics somewhat uneasy. “The total effect was more frightening than all the Alice Coopers and Clockwork Oranges put together, simply because these guys weren’t joking,” said Nick Kent in New Musical Express. Michael Oldfield of Melody Maker felt Iggy and the band were on the verge of the dangerous, “It’s like a flashback 200 years, to the times when the rich paid to go into insane asylums and see madmen go into convulsions.”

      Photographer  Mick Rock admitted that he felt “distinctly intimidated” as he photographed the show.He never did precisely know what he was preserving.  When MainMan called him down to the show, he was told only that the night needed to be captured in all its flaming Glory. It would be another year before one of the shots he took  that evening was blown up for the cover of the Stooges’ third album, a close up of the singers torso, leaning on his mic stand, his face set and beautiful, staring into space. Pop later claimed that he hated it.

     Pop, Rock said, ”was already in my mind more mythological than human. His appeal was omnisexual;  he was physically very beautiful, (and) the silver hair and silver trousers only added to the sense of the mythological. He seemed to have emerged from some bizarre primal hinterland, so much bigger than life, emoting and projecting a tingling menace. He was…a cultural revolutionary, operating well ahead of his time.” The question that nobody dared ask was, was anybody truly ready to take the burden on? …..

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 Set Lists:

Lou Reed

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14-07-72 (technically this was really 15-07 because Lou did not play till after midnight)
SCALA CINEMA, KING’S CROSS, LONDON, UK
White Light/White Heat – I’m Waiting For The Man – Ride Into The Sun – New Age – Walk And Talk It – Sweet Jane – Going Down – I Can’t Stand It – Berlin – Cool It Down – Wild Child – Rock And Roll – Heroin

 

 David Bowie 15-07  

Dubbed The most celebrated gig in Friars history  

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Friars Aylesbury, Borough Assembly Hall, Market Square, Aylesbury, UK
HANG ON TO YOURSELF; ZIGGY STARDUST; THE SUPERMEN; QUEEN BITCH; SONG FOR BOB DYLAN; CHANGES; STARMAN; FIVE YEARS; SPACE ODDITY; ANDY WARHOL; AMSTERDAM; I FEEL FREE; MOONAGE DAYDREAM; WHITE LIGHT/WHITE HEAT; GOT TO GET A JOB; SUFFRAGETTE CITY; ROCK N ROLL SUICIDE

 Iggy Pop and The Stooges:

15-07 (technically this was really 16-07 because they did not play till after midnight)
SCALA CINEMA or King Sound (I guess was the name of King’s Cross Cinema, at least temporarily), KING’S CROSS, LONDON, UK
I got a right, Scene of the Crime, Gimme Some Skin, Im Sick of you, The Shadow of your Smile (Tony Benett cover) , Money That What I Want (Barret Strong Cover), Tight Pants,Fresh Rag, Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell, Search and Destroy, Penetration 

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Iggy and the Stooges: Interview with Scott Asheton | Montreal Freelance Writer – Chris Barry

It only took three decades or so after they split up for the world at large to recognize how thoroughly brilliant they were, but Ann Arbor, Michigan band the Stooges, widely considered little more than a sick joke by the time they finally called it a day in 1974, are now right up there alongside Chuck Berry, the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones when people start talking about rock ’n’ roll greatness. I spoke with drummer Scott Asheton a little earlier this week, a man who doesn’t generate quite the attention his bandmate Iggy Pop does, but whose contribution to the still unique sound of the Stooges is only underestimated by fools.

Source: Iggy and the Stooges: Interview with Scott Asheton | Montreal Freelance Writer – Chris Barry

ShirrStone Shelter

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Transgen Syren ReBirth
Miniature porcelain twins doll undergone changes.
After the forced surgery has survived only one sister.
Now she is free, healthy …. only sometimes misses his sister.
Recovered hands and sprouted limbs.
Blind Siren became strong young Octowoman …
She survived and enjoy freedom.This is her second birth.

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NYMPHOSIS
The “pupation” is the metamorphosis of insects, the number of intermediate processes that brings the larva to turn into nymph. The caterpillar changes to become chrysalis, hibernation that will give life to the butterfly. The universe is dark but interpreted with multiple eyes: ironic, critical, sensual, naive. You feel the strong presence of drawing contrasting with the world of abstraction, symbolism and surrealism.

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Brian Eno “Baby’s on Fire”

Here Comes the Warm Jets – Brian Eno

Forgotten Rock Classics

Here Come the Warm Jets Here Come the Warm Jets

“Baby’s on Fire”

This song might have the greatest guitar solo ever put down on vinyl. If you were to look at any web posts, magazines or other forms of media about the greatest guitar solo’s ever you will not find this song on any of them. I wish that I could tell you why, maybe because it is not well known. Brian Eno’s style of music doesn’t create such a stir within the music industry. Maybe because his music has always been more advanced then the times. This song has never got the publicity that it desires for it’s guitar solo but maybe it’s time we try to change that.

“Here Come the Warm Jets”, is the debut album by Brian Eno. Produced by Eno himself and released on Island Records in 1974. Eno’s music style has been described as experimental rock, glam…

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Weapons of Unique Creation

Bull Shotgun Paintings

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During his later years in Kansas, Burroughs developed a painting technique whereby he created abstract compositions by placing spray paint cans in front of, and some distance from, blank canvasses, and then shooting at the paint cans with a shotgun. These splattered canvasses were exposed in various Galleries during the early 1990s. 

In an interview with Gregory Ego, entitled “William Burroughs & the Flicker Machine”, as published in David Kerekes’ 2003 “Headpress (the journal of sex religion death)”, William explains how he made shotgun art painting, and others. Here’s a portion of this interview: 

EGO: Are you still doing your “shotgun art?”

BURROUGHS: Oh, all kinds. Brushwork. Shotgun. Paint. Knife.

EGO: What exact process do you use for your visual art?wsb63

BURROUGHS: There is no exact process. If you want to do shotgun art, you take a piece of plywood, put a can of spray paint in front of it, and shoot it with a shotgun or high powered rifle. The paint’s under high pressure so it explodes! Throws the can 300 feed. The paint sprays in exploding color across your surface. You can have as many colors as you want. Turn it around, do it sideways, and have one color coming in from this side and this side. Of course, they hit. Mix in all kinds of unpredictable patterns. This is related to Pollock’s drip canvases, although this is a rather more basically random process, there’s no possibility of predicting what patterns you’re going to get.
I’ve had some I’ve worked over for months. Get the original after the explosions and work it over with brushes and spray paints and silhouettes until I’m satisfied. So, there isn’t any set procedure. Sometimes you get it right there and you don’t touch it. The most important thing in painting is to know when to stop, when everything is finished. Doesn’t mean anything in writing.

EGO: It does rely to a high degree on chance — the shotgun art? images

BURROUGHS: It introduces a random factor, certainly.

EGO: Just like the cut-up method.

BURROUGHS: Yes. But you don’t have to use it all, you can use that as background. There’re a lot of other randomizing procedures like “marbling.” Take water and spray your paint on top of the water and then put your paper or whatever in the water and pull it out and it sticks in all sorts of random patterns. And then there’s the old inkblot. [Ruffles imaginary paper] Like that. Sometimes they’re good only as background or sometimes you get a picture that you’re satisfied with at once. There is no certain procedure.

EGO: Allen Ginsberg proposed to me that the cut-up technique you developed with Brion Gysin is a sort of counter-brainwashing technique. Do you agree with that?

Burroughs Art Works - Courtesy of William S Burroughs Estate, which will be pat of the Animals in the Wall exhibition

BURROUGHS: It has that aspect in that you’re breaking down the word, you’re creating new words. Right as soon as you start cutting, you’re getting new words, new combinations of words. Yes, it has that aspect, sure.
But remember that all this brainwashing and propaganda, etc., is not by any means expected to reach any intelligent corners. It isn’t expected to convince anybody that has any sense. If they can get ten percent, that’s good. That’s the aim of propaganda; to get ten percent. They’re not trying to convince people that have a grain of sense. spb

shotgunart

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Wanna see more? Trespass (click).      

Burroughs gun