Wayne Martin Belger’s Transcendent Art

Chambers of Pure Enlightment

 Photo by Laura Morton
The artist/photographer photographed by Laura Morton

To judge by price at auction and in galleries, and its popularity through museum exhibits, books and photo fairs, fine art photography is now in the lofty realms of well, fine art. Granted these aren’t grandma’s snapshots of birthdays and vacation landscapes, but rather images from classicists like Diane Arbus, Jacques Henri Lartigue and Weegee who capture moments, people and places with both their eyes and techniques; outsiders like Miroslav Tichy who organically created his voyeuristic single print photographs with cameras made from discarded objects he discovered on the Czech streets like cans, boxes and eyeglasses, decorating with doodles the resulting work which originally created was only for himself; and Andreas Gursky who are redefining the genre through use of stitching, pixilation and other digital manipulation. Wayne Martin Belger‘s photographs and intricate, one-of-kind, hand-built cameras — themselves works of art, often set with gemstones and talismans; crafted with human organs and skulls, blood, bones and blood — boldly combine both the ancient and post-modern, using a viewing method that can be traced as far back as China in the 5th century B.C., to Aristotle, Euclid, and later Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) who refined the technique in his the 10th Century Book of Optics, before emerging as in 1850 as photographic device. The process begins with Belger first desiring to explore and relate to a concept and envisioning the photographs, then crafting a camera as the portal into the subject. He collects artifacts, relics and metals, and painstakingly builds the device with parts he carefully machines, the construction itself a form of meditation on and communion with the concepts and images, much like icon painters who first pray and meditate, then carefully prepare the surface, blend the tempera and delicately layer the colors. Using 4×5 film and existing light, Belger can spend anywhere from 10 seconds to 90 minutes with the pinhole aperture open to capture a single shot in the camera designed specifically for a series, with the goal “to be the sacred bridge of a communion offering between myself and the subject. All to witness and be a tool of the horrors of creation and the beauty of decay presented by the author of light and time.” To compare and contrast, 35mm movie film runs 24 frames per second, while high-speed digital still cameras can shoot 60 frames per second. With the emulsion film exposed for extended periods, Belger’s photographs become movies distilled onto a single frame. Photons from the stationary object of focus, as well as moving objects in the field, are absorbed onto the emulsion, creating softened, at times ghost-like, images.

Belger: With pinhole photography, the same air that touches my subject can pass through the pinhole and touch the photo emulsion on the film. There’s no barrier between the two. There are no lenses changing and manipulating light. There are no chips converting light to binary code. With pinhole what you get is an unmanipulated true representation of a segment of light and time, a pure reflection of what is at that moment.

Belger: The tools I create and work with are pinhole cameras. With pinhole photography, the same air that touches my subject can pass through the pinhole and touch the photo emulsion on the film. There’s no barrier between the two. There are no lenses changing and manipulating light. There are no chips converting light to binary code. With pinhole what you get is an unmanipulated true representation of a segment of light and time, a pure reflection of what is at that moment. With some exposure times getting close to 2 hours, it’s an unsegmented movie from a movie camera with only one frame. The creation of a camera comes from my desire to relate to a subject. When I choose a subject I spend time studying it. Then I start visualizing how I would like a photo of the subject to look. When that’s figured out, I start on the camera stage of the project by collecting parts, artifacts and relics that relate to the subject. When I’ve gathered enough parts and feel for the subject, I start the construction of the camera. I create the cameras from Aluminum, Titanium, Copper, Brass, Bronze, Steel, Silver, Gold, Wood, Acrylic, Glass, Horn, Ivory, Bone, Human Bone, Human Skulls, Human Organs, Formaldehyde, HIV+ Blood and relics all designed to be the sacred bridge of a communion offering between myself and the subject. All to witness and be a tool of the horrors of creation and the beauty of decay presented by the author light and time.

The Third Eye Camera:

third eye cam
Designed to study the beauty of decay. 4”x5” camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Brass, Silver, Gem Stones and a 150 year old skull of a 13 year old girl. Light and time enters at the third eye, exposing the film in the middle of the skull.

3rdeye_quarter 3rd_eye-side Astonishing results: Can you see some weird ghostly face formed in the Third Eye Camera ”bright chamber”? Creepy? Maybe. That’s a very narrow minded way to see the whole concept. I bet that this ghostly face alone by itself was worth all the efforts that putting that camera together required. This little girl is going to be able to see images in her own skull again.  Maybe it was her way of saying Hello!! and THANK YOU!!! The concept of this camera and the images it produces are to my humble opinion so out of this world!! I bet William Gibson and especially Burroughs would have loved this shit!!!!

San Francisco - 11"x14" gelatin silver print from Polaroid negative
San Francisco – 11″x14″ gelatin silver print from Polaroid negative
Two Hearts 11"x14" gelatin silver print (from Roadside Altar series)
Two Hearts – 11″x14″ gelatin silver print (from Roadside Altar series).
Third Eye Photo Install
Third Eye Photo Install

Yama (Tibetan Skull Camera)

Designed for the study of exodus and for the research of modern incarnations of historical iconic figures. “Yama,” the Tibetan God of Death. In Tibetan Buddhism, Yama will see all of life and Karma is the “judge” that keeps the balance. The skull was blessed by a Tibetan Lama for its current journey and I’m working with a Tibetan legal organization that is sending me to the refugee cities in India.is carefully crafted from the 500-year-old skull of a Tibetan monk and retro-fitted with copper, aluminum and brass camera pieces machined by Belger, who painstakingly placed the camera’s dual pinholes in the exact position of the pupils. The camera’s internal mechanism is split, producing two exact images that when printed and viewed at a distance become three-dimensional. The skull is set with sterling silver and gems including several large rubies over the pineal gland/third eye, plus sapphires, opals, and turquoise. It rests in a large gilt-edged mirrored box, reminiscent of a memento mori, fittingly as Yama is the Tibetan god of death. The box sits atop a silk prayer cloth on a wooden table; below, a plumb/pendulum of brass filled with artist’s blood and mercury swings over a container of pearls and sand, a stunning installation that unites and transcends the concepts of form and function. This all might sound a bit morbid, but Yama’s countenance smiles knowingly, cheerily from his glass box, eager to be readied for his work. Or simply to be admired. yama_front yama_side2 Yama’s eyes are cast from bronze and silver with a brass pinhole in each. A divider runs down the middle of the skull creating two separate cameras. A finished contact print mounted on copper is inserted in to the back of the camera to view what Yama saw in 3D. yama_side-close yama_workings Yama is made from Aluminium, Titanium, Copper, Brass, Bronze Steel, Silver, Gold, Mercury with 4 Sapphires, 3 Rubies (The one at Yama’s third eye was $5000.00), Asian and American Turquoise, Sand, Blood, and 9 Opals inlayed in the Skull. The film loading system is pneumatic. A 360 psi air tank in the middle of the camera powers 2 pneumatic pistons to move the film holder forward and lock it into place. The switch to open and close the film chamber is located under the jaw. yama_eye yama_side-close2 Designed for two photo series. First series is of my interpretation of the modern incarnation of Southeast Asians deities. Second will take place in the Tibetan refugee cities of India, a home-coming through the eyes of a 500-year-old Tibetan. Picture taken:

Kali - 32"x40" toned gelatin silver print subject painted with Prickly Pair Black tea.
Kali – 32″x40″ toned gelatin silver print
subject painted with Prickly Pair Black tea.
Magdaline - 11"x14" toned gelatin silver print
Magdaline – 11″x14″ toned gelatin silver print

Untouchable (HIV Camera)

Designed to study and photograph a geographic comparison of people suffering from HIV. For “Blood Works” his exploration and study of HIV/AIDS, Belger created the “Untouchable (HIV),” camera using aluminum, copper, titanium and acrylic. HIV+ blood from one of Belger’s friends-the blood is treated with heparin sulfate to prevent coagulation-pumps through the camera then in front of the pinhole, becoming a #25 red filter. For shooting with “Untouchable,” Belger holds opens calls, and has captured a wide range of HIV+ people across the United States, with plans to photograph HIV+/AIDS subjects throughout Africa this upcoming spring in advance of his participation in a December 2012 group show at the Royal Ontario Museum, which will also include his Third Eye, Yama and Heart cameras and the photos they produce. The show also features works from Joel Peter Witkin, Steven Gregory, Marc Quinn (whose models include Buck Angel and whose sculpture “Alison Lapper Pregnant” was installed in Trafalgar Square), Robert Krasnow, WhiteFeather, Francois Robert, Weiki Somers, Charles LeDray, Rosamond Purcell and Mark Prent. Belger produces a limited number of prints, usually fewer than 10 of each shot. Collectors of the unique, intricate devices receive one of each print along with the camera that created them, with the agreement that Belger can borrow back the camera to continue the series. In exchange they receive a copy of each new print. Other aficionados collect only the ethereal images. hiv_left 4″x5″ camera made from Aluminium, Copper, Titanium, Acrylic and HIV positive blood. The blood pumps through the camera then in front of the pinhole and becomes my #25 red filter. Designed to shoot a geographic comparison of people suffering from HIV.

hiv_install
Untouchable HIV Photo Install

 Yemaya (Underwater Camera)

Now I am aware that the concept on this one might seem less ”original” and I realise it,s far from being the first underwater camera but I still chose to show that one simply for the love of bold surreal chromed, sorta Captain Nemo look of this camera and reminds me of how great are the capabilities of Wayne Martin Belger not ONLY as an artist, but also as a crafty camera builder technician. This camera is as functional as it is truly magnificent.

4"x5" underwater pinhole camera made from Aluminium, Acrylic, Brass, Sea creatures and Pearls. An altar to the Santeria Goddess of the ocean, Yemaya, is inside the back of the camera.
4″x5″ underwater pinhole camera made from Aluminium, Acrylic, Brass, Sea creatures and Pearls. An altar to the Santeria Goddess of the ocean, Yemaya, is inside the back of the camera.

yemaya_side2 yemaya_side yemaya_back yemaya_back-close Underwater photos:

"The Valiant" - First photo from Yemaya, off the coast of Catalina Island, depicting a sunken ship at 105 ft. deep. The exposure was 1 and a half hours long. 20"x24" C-print.
“The Valiant” – First photo from Yemaya, off the coast of Catalina Island, depicting a sunken ship at 105 ft. deep. The exposure was 1 and a half hours long. 20″x24″ C-print.
Catalina - 120"x24" C-print
Catalina – 120″x24″ C-print

Heart Camera

Last but not least… This project documents mothers who are at least eight months pregnant. The 4×5 pinhole camera created for the project contains the heart of a child who died at birth. The heart, donated by a gallery owner who found it among a collection of old anatomy equipment, is preserved in a sealed compartment at the rear of the camera. Despite its chilling reminder of the risks of childbirth, Belger says he was surprised by how well the mothers took to the Heart camera. Word about his project spread fast, with expecting mothers now contacting the photographer to set a date. So far Belger has photographed portraits of 30 women so far. He’s even been invited to photograph women giving birth. Belger is able to capture only one frame, about a ten-minute exposure, and begins to expose the film just before his subject gives birth. heart_front1

heart_back
Designed to take photos of soon-to-be mothers who are at least 8 months pregnant, and explore my relationship with my twin brother who died at birth. 4″x5″ camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Acrylic, Formaldehyde and an infant human heart.
Designed to take photos of soon-to-be mothers who are at least 8 months pregnant, and explore my relationship with my twin brother who died at birth. 4"x5" camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Acrylic, Formaldehyde and an infant human heart.
Designed to take photos of soon-to-be mothers who are at least 8 months pregnant, and explore my relationship with my twin brother who died at birth.
4″x5″ camera made from Aluminium, Titanium, Acrylic, Formaldehyde and an infant human heart.

 Some Photos Taken with The Heart Camera:

photo02

photo03 photo04 (2) photo05 photo06

Belger’s beautiful machines and the photographs he produces with them are stunning, surreal, yet incredibly grounded and visceral expressions of the artist’s and subjects’ place in time and light, and our brief time and place on earth.

MAIN LINK TO WAYNE MARTIN BELGER WEBSITE

9 /11 Deer – Wood Dragonfly – Altar  Classic

boyofblue@yahoo.com
 By Tobe Damit
By Tobe Damit
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Tobe Damit

To read the page I did on myself and what I have done cut and paste this address in your browser http://wp.me/P4zD8p-ja (short link) or https://tobedamit.com/httpfr-gravatar-comtobedamit/ (permalink).

4 thoughts on “Wayne Martin Belger’s Transcendent Art”

    1. I’m so glad you left me this comment. Comments like this justifies all the time I put into Loud Alien Noize. You just made my day. Thank YOU so much!!! Wayne Martin Belger is an astounding artist. I was so impressed the first time I heard about him. I hope he sees that post and your comment!!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. As expected, you did not disappoint me one iota, Tobe. Mr. Belger’s works are exotic, meaningful, and inspirational. As one whose hobby is photography, I am in total awe of his creativity and means of sharing imagery in a new light – and in inventive ways. My GOODNESS! Keep ’em coming, Tobe! You have NO idea how your blog is igniting a FIRE in me! Thanks, again!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad that you share my admiration for Mr Belger. The whole concept of photography has reached a whole new level with this guy. Thanks for your comment and ”accurate” support!!! I so love the fact that he makes cameras specialy for a certain type of picture and models… I know this is kinda old but still… It blows me outta my socks each time I read and look at it!!

      Liked by 1 person

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