Love is a Dog from Hell

adogfromhell

Turnabout

she drives into the parking lot while
I am leaning up against the fender of my car.
she’s drunk and her eyes are wet with tears:
you son of a bitch, you fucked me when you
didn’t want to. you told me to keep phoning
you, you told me to move closer into town,
then you told me to leave you alone.”

it’s all quite dramatic and I enjoy it.
”sure, well, what do you want?”

I want to talk to you, I want to go to your
place and talk to you…

I’m with somebody now. she’s in getting a sandwich.

I want to talk to you…it takes a while
to get over things. I need more time,

sure. wait until she comes out. we’re not
inhuman. we’ll all have a drink together.

‘shit” she says, ”oh shit!

she jumps into her car and drives off.

the other one comes out: ”who was that?

an ex-friend

Now she’s gone and I’m sitting here drunk
and my eyes seems wet with tears.

it’s very quiet and I feel like I have a spear
rammed into the center of my gut.

I walk to the bathroom and I puke.

mercy. I think, doesnt the human race know anything
about mercy?  

 loveis by Charles Bukowski

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Bukowski Uncensored

I’m Such a Spoiled Old Toad!

In 1993, candid conversations between Charles Bukowski, his wife, and his producer took place in Bukowski’s home during the recording session for his classic Run With the Hunted.

We brought the outtakes to life for HarperCollins.

Animation by Drew Christie  & harperaudioclassics.com

 

 

LA Vintage

The City of Angels 1960/1970

Main

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Care for a thick large shake or a foot long chili dog for 30 cents? Pico and Lincoln Boulevard in Santa Monica back in 1966! Today this corner is a Starbucks. Photo by ©Denise Scott Brown 
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“Mustang Sally, think you better slow your mustang down” A rare Kodachrome image of the Whisky a Go Go in 1966!
Pandora's Box
“There’s something happening here” Pandora’s Box on The Sunset Strip. Located in the center Island of Sunset Blvd and Crescent Heights. Year: 1966
Harry and Alice Schiller owned the Pink Pussy Cat on Santa Monica Blvd. Dancers with clever stage names such as Fran Sinatra, Samya Davis Jr., Deena Martin, Peeler Lawford, Joanie Carson, Joey Pine,Edie McMahon, Joie Bishop, and Reegie Philbin put on glittering shows for a packed crowd—which often included members of the Rat Pack!
Harry and Alice Schiller owned the Pink Pussy Cat on Santa Monica Blvd. Dancers with clever stage names such as Frank Sinatra, Samy Davis Jr., Dean Martin, Peter Lawford, Joanie Carson, Joey Pine,Edie McMahon, Joie Bishop, and Reggie Philbin put on glittering shows for a packed crowd—which often included members of the Rat Pack!
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Sandy Koufax was one of the original owners of the Tropicana Motel on Santa Monica Blvd. The motel was actually called “Sandy Koufax’s Tropicana Motor Hotel” in the early 60’s. The Tropicana became a popular hangout in the 70’s for the Runaways, Blondie, The Ramones, Iggy Pop and The Clash.
“To Everything – Turn, Turn, Turn”…The Byrds and The Doors at the Whisky a Go Go in 1967. The Ford Mustang is only a year old in this photo!
“The dingbat typifies Los Angeles apartment building architecture at its worst,” California historian Leonard Pitto once declared. But the simple, boxy apartment buildings have become as beloved as they are loathed, and are as common as palm trees and parking garages to the Los Angeles landscape.

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Bitchin bells on The Sunset Strip – 1966 Photo: Domenic Priore
The Trip
Funnily enough, the Pop issue’s cover was immediately appropriated by Andy Warhol — who was by then well on his way to displacing Lichtenstein as Pop art’s most prominent practitioner — for a poster promoting the Velvet Underground and the Inevitable Plastic Show tour the following month.
Nancy Sinatra lounging around in a Pucci dress at her Beverly Hills home in Trousdale, Ron Joy 1967.
Nancy Sinatra lounging around in a Pucci dress at her Beverly Hills home in Trousdale, Ron Joy 1967.
Iggy with his
Iggy with his “Real Wild Child” L.A. pals, Danny Sugerman & Ray Manzarek in Los Angeles, 15 June 1974. (James Fortune/Rex Features)
“The West Is The Best” Jim Morrison in the closet at the Chateau Marmont on Sunset Strip. Photo by Art Kane/1968
For some strange reason this reminds of LA writer Charles Bukowski.
For some strange reason this reminds of LA writer Charles Bukowski.
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Los Angeles-based photographer Hugh Holland honed his craft documenting the emerging skateboard culture that was born to the background of iconic 1970’s. Just click on image for more!
Los Angeles Wich Stand Drive In Vintage Matchbook Print. 1950-60's
Los Angeles Wich Stand Drive In Vintage Matchbook Print. 1950-60’s

Los Angeles used to have a lot of spectacular vintage restaurants and still does, but we are still losing many every year to owners who retire, sell out for money or lose their long-held lease to nasty gentrification. I’m a sucker for a joint with history, charm, character and stories. I’m not as selective about a menu as I am about the ambiance, atmosphere and what I am experiencing. I’m a junkie for vintage architecture and old signs. I pray that old places don’t renovate their mid-century or even mid-’70s decor.” – Nikki Kreuzer, Editor of the Offbeat

restaurants
Just click on the pics for details.

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Charles Bukowski/Love is a (Mad) Dog from Hell

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Alone with Everybody

the flesh covers the bone
and they put a mind
in there and
sometimes a soul,
and the women break
vases against the walls
and the men drink too
much
and nobody finds the
one
but keep
looking
crawling in and out
of beds.
flesh covers
the bone and the
flesh searches
for more than
flesh.

there’s no chance
at all:
we are all trapped
by a singular
fate.

nobody ever finds
the one.

the city dumps fill
the junkyards fill
the madhouses fill
the hospitals fill
the graveyards fill

nothing else
fills.

From Love is a Dog from Hell” by Henry Charles Bukowski  adogfromhell

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Charles Bukowski

Born Into This

Born Into This, a film documenting the author’s life, was released in 2003. It features contributions from Sean Penn, Tom Waits, Harry Dean Stanton and Bono (U2’s song “Dirty Day” was dedicated to Bukowski when released in 1993).

Henry Charles Bukowski was an American poet, novelist and short story writer. His writing was influenced by the social, cultural and economic ambience of his home city of Los Angeles. It is marked by an emphasis on the ordinary lives of poor Americans, the act of writing, alcohol, relationships with women and the drudgery of work. Bukowski wrote thousands of poems, hundreds of short stories and six novels, eventually publishing over sixty books. In 1986 Time called Bukowski a “laureate of American lowlife”. Regarding Bukowski’s enduring popular appeal, Adam Kirsch of The New Yorker wrote, “the secret of Bukowski’s appeal. . . [is that] he combines the confessional poet’s promise of intimacy with the larger-than-life aplomb of a pulp-fiction hero.”

Bukowski died of leukemia on March 9, 1994, in San Pedro, California, aged 73, shortly after completing his last novel, Pulp. The funeral rites, orchestrated by his widow, were conducted by Buddhist monks. An account of the proceedings can be found in Gerald Locklin’s book Charles Bukowski: A Sure Bet. His gravestone reads: “Don’t Try”, a phrase which Bukowski uses in one of his poems, advising aspiring writers and poets about inspiration and creativity. Bukowski explained the phrase in a 1963 letter to John William Corrington: “Somebody at one of these places […] asked me: ‘What do you do? How do you write, create?’ You don’t, I told them. You don’t try. That’s very important: ‘not’ to try, either for Cadillacs, creation or immortality. You wait, and if nothing happens, you wait some more. It’s like a bug high on the wall. You wait for it to come to you. When it gets close enough you reach out, slap out and kill it. Or if you like its looks you make a pet out of it.”

Bukowski published extensively in small literary magazines and with small presses beginning in the early 1940s and continuing on through the early 1990s. These poems and stories were later republished by Black Sparrow Press (now HarperCollins/ECCO) as collected volumes of his work. In the 1980s he collaborated with illustrator Robert Crumb on a series of comic books, with Bukowski supplying the writing and Crumb providing the artwork.

Bukowski often spoke of Los Angeles as his favorite subject. In a 1974 interview he said, “You live in a town all your life, and you get to know every bitch on the street corner and half of them you have already messed around with. You’ve got the layout of the whole land. You have a picture of where you are…. Since I was raised in L.A., I’ve always had the geographical and spiritual feeling of being here. I’ve had time to learn this city. I can’t see any other place than L.A.”

One critic has described Bukowski’s fiction as a “detailed depiction of a certain taboo male fantasy: the uninhibited bachelor, slobby, anti-social, and utterly free”, an image he tried to live up to with sometimes riotous public poetry readings and boorish party behaviour. Since his death in 1994 Bukowski has been the subject of a number of critical articles and books about both his life and writings. His work has received relatively little attention from academic critics. ECCO continues to release new collections of his poetry, culled from the thousands of works published in small literary magazines. According to ECCO, the 2007 release The People Look Like Flowers At Last will be his final posthumous release as now all his once-unpublished work has been published.

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